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president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
, the united states has made all these mistakes, kind of like a colonial power down through the years. >> right. >> obama spends a lot of time apologizing for america. do you think that will come out in the debate tonight? >> i hope so. romney has shown an ability to be very tough debater while still being very kind. it's a nice combo platter he has, but you have with obama the guy who denied american exceptionalism. we're the only non-imperialist superpower in the history of the world. is he unaware of that? oh, yes, i'm sure english, they think they are exceptional, too. that was his response to american exceptionalism. you had him bowing for all of the world leaders. you had him leading from behind during the arab spring which these guys were so enthusiastic about, and we see the result of it, with the death of our ambassador and three other americans. no, obama's view is not that america is an exceptional country, and i hope that does come out. >> steve mcmahon, we could have actually landed troops in benghazi. that is now coming out. the president actually met with leon panetta, and nothin
inability to understand what's going on in the middle east and the threats that the united states, israel, and our arab friends face and inindicative of a larger problem globally. i think for governor romney to articulate a peace through strength through foreign policy will be a substantial contrast with what the obama administration has failed to achieve. >> everyone's focusing on benghazi at the moment. before we get to this, talk about the world view. look at egypt turning his back on must b've got russia,e islamists. tell me more about your view of that world view and how you think mr. romney could define it tomorrow. >> well, i think this goes to the basic issue of america's place in the world. do you think as president obama does that america's too strong, that we've had too much influence, that we're kansa disproportionately successful around the worn america that withdraws, that's less assertive will make other nations more favorably inclined to us and make the world more peaceful. that's like looking at the world through the wrong end of a telescope. i think the notion of
security threat to the united states and to israel. that's why i authorized the most crippling sanctions one country has ever eleven individual against another against iran. the results of that we just saw in news reports this week their currency devalued by 40%. the shipments of oil dramatically reduced hurting their economy. those sanctions i co-authorized is to create an economic news to deter them from seeking nuclear weapons. so i believe these sanctions still have time. it is been suggestioned the time clock is sometime next year. if these sanctions cripple their economy, i think we can deter them. >> well, that all sounds just fine but unfortunately, it doesn't appear that the sanctions are working. too little, too late and it's a very critical time for our country and for the world at large. and so i know that as a member of the senate, i'm going to do everything humanly possible through my vote, through advocacy and in every other way to make sure that iran never, never gets a nuclear weapon. this is the greatest threat to our country and to the world. and i just hope that the f
cyberspace better. >> host: mr. o'harrow if you look at cyberspace in the united states right now, how would you describe security overall? let's just describe maybe break-ins in the neighborhood. >> guest: in the spirit of explanatory mission we have to can't really talk about cyberspace and the united states. a computer user in washington d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder-to-shoulder with a computer worker in beijing or in moscow. there there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i would point that out. as for the security, the reality is that it's almost remarkable how vulnerable computer systems are. cyberspace is not what most people think it is. most people now a quite cyberspace with the internet, but if they want to be clear about what cyberspace is i think it's important to note that it's the gps system on the new cars. it's the iphone and the droid. its jet fighters and jet planes. and anything anything that is driven by computers -- excuse me, by computer code and is linked to networks can be a part
to be president president of the united states. is a democratic analyst, to us it just sort of reignited the whole medicare issue because you know we have spent a lot of time and glen and i do senate and house campaigns, talking about the ryan plan. and you know, sometimes we talk about the ryan plan without saying the ryan plan because people didn't know who paul ryan was. well, now they do and now they know there is a ryan plan on medicare. so in the polling we have done and i'm sure glen has done polling of his own, we see it's an effective message for democrats against republicans to talk about the ryan plan and the republican plan on medicare. >> before you jump and glen let me push back a little here. >> go right ahead. [laughter] >> a day or two before governor romney made his decision on running mates i was talking with stan greenberg, another democratic pollster and he runs a democracy corps with james carville and they have been desperately trying to use the ryan plan you know, to basically beat republican members of congress about the head with the ryan plan and with minimal success bec
better. >> hos wel if look at cyberace the united states rinow, how wouldou debe surityverall? much as we would deribe, maybe, crime or break-ins in a neighborhood? >> guest: well in the spirit of the explanatory mission we have, you can't really talk about cyberspace in the united states. a computer user in washington, d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or in moscow. there's literally no seconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i'd point that out. as for the security, the reality is that, um, it's almost remarkable how vulnerabl comp sysms are. and cyberspace, um, is not what most people think it is. most people now equate cyberspace with the bear net. -- internet. but if they want to think about what cyberspace is, it's the gps system on the new cars, it's the iphone and the droids, it's jet fighters and jet planes. anything that is driven by computers, excuse me, by computer code and is linked to networks, um, can be a part of cyberspace. and the vulnerabilities are, um, almo s
, when you don't have basic command of facts and you're the president of the united states, whoa, that's a big problem. >> does that fear that a lot of people may share what charlie translate to people, saying, you know what i'm going to pour the money into mitt romney. >> i'm not convinced just not convinced. i think he was really appealing, if you were on the sidelines and in the middle you may be persuaded and i think that he pushed back, you know, the people most critical of romney was g.o.p. talking heads. >> republicans. >> yeah, they ripped him. now, they see him in there. >> for good reason. but they put them in their place now and that probably is the best outcome for him. >> and what mitt romney at least listened to his critics. the scary thing about president obama, four years in office and he doesn't listen. >> adam, want to go to you for the last word. >> well, mitt romney's had a lot of critics, you have to listen when it's in your own party as gerri was saying and the republican party was like, it's like some sort of weird sort of thing, and personality and-- >> and ever
came to the united states -- parents came to the united states from india five years ago. >>> five things to know on this thursday morning. a viewing for former senator george mcgovern takes place in sioux falls, south dakota this afternoon. his funeral will be tomorrow. mcgovern died last sunday at the age of 90. >>> a car booster seat for children, it turns out they're getting safer. the insurance institute for highway safety just released a list this is the best of the best. >> 15 of the 17 seats introduced did make the list in the iihs says seat makers are making better designed seats between the ages of 4 and 8 years old. >>> feel like you're seeing an ad for expanded gambling every 30 seconds? it's not much of a stretch. that's kind of accurate. so far, both sides have spent a combined $50 million to influence your vote. compare that to $34 million total that was spent back in 2006 for the maryland gubernatorial race. >>> all right parents check in out. a killer treat could be in your child's halloween bag. >> too much black licorice could actually cause a drop in potassium l
of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to blieve on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state and a two-state solution, something on other occasions he's been less than supportive of. so it's kind of a mishmash for me. that's how i see it. >> rose: a couple things. one, on syria, he seems to want to support the rebels with arms, at least. that's different. >> yeah. and here i think -- i
the united states. why did the 13 colonies develop as they do? one of the reasons was it was jam packed with natural well-protected harbors in the northeast. and the tempered zone of what is now the united states, it was last resource-rich part of the temperate zone that was settled by europeans at the time of the enlightenment and it had more miles of inland waterways than the rest of the world combined. so that enabled the develment of american nationhood. these facts are so obvious that they get overlooked in the current debate. >> rose: i want to take different countries and look at it to understand your thesis, both in terms of their history and future and elements of their geography that make them who they are take china today. >> okay. all right. take china. china has two big geographical issues. on the one hand, china is big, it's vast. because it's stretching out in terms of the its corporate enterprises, its demography into he ruian far east where there's always this timber, diamonds and gold that the chinese want. a hundred million people in manchuria over the boarder in the
. that man is standing back here. presidente the unite of the united states. please welcome the next president of united states, mitt romney. [cheers and applause] ♪ [playing "born free"] ♪ >> that is one heck of a virginia welcome. thank you, virginia. [cheers and applause] you, paul. does the music just bring up your day? [applause] then he for the endorsement of the -- we appreciate the endorsement of the nra. [applause] last night was an important night for the country. [cheers and applause] they got the chance to cut through all the attacks and counterattacks and all the theatrics associate with the campaign and instead listen to substance. i appreciate the fact athat jim lehrer asked questions about substance. i appreciated that i was able to ask obama about obamacare. i asked, why is it that the middle class is still buried in this country? why we have millions of people out of work? why is it that half of our children coming out of college cannot find a job? why is it that when he took office, 32 million people are on food stamps? i asked him those questions. you heard hi
energy capital of, of the united states. and that's why i think we need to do everything we can to bolster tourism because it's still the backbone of our economy. when it comes to issues that effect the state of nevada, our delegation has worked very, very well together. let me give you an example. yucca mountain. it doesn't matter what party you're in, what side of the aisle. the fact of the matter is that the nevada delegation stood fast when it came to protecting the people of the state of nevada from acquiring nuclear waste from the rest of the country. i think that's one good example. when it comes to other things, i worked very closely and across the aisle with people every day when it comes to our support for israel, when we insure that the iranians don't acquire nuclear weapons, and i think i would work with anybody to make sure that we got our economy back on track, to get our budget under control and we end wasteful spending. >> moderator: okay, thank you. senator heller? heller: rick, thanks for the question. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about something i thin
these debates do you have any doubt who they will likely appoint to the supreme court of the united states? how much chance do you think row v. wade will survive after four years of a romney supreme court? >> reporter: but tonight it is the husbands' turn. later on this evening mitt romney and president obama are scheduled to appear at the al smith dinner. that's a benefit hosted by the archdiocese of new york. it's typically a light hearted affair where the politicians set aside their verbal jabs and try their punch lines instead. we'll have to see how both do later on this evening. >> remember, i saw the tape earlier today. remember from four years ago when then the candidates john mccain and barack obama they were at that dinner. they were both hilarious. any inside word on how mitt romney is preparing for some of the laughs tonight? >> reporter: funny you should ask, wolf. as you recall yesterday dennis miller, you'll recall he was the funny man on weekend update on "saturday night live." he was campaigning with mitt romney across virginia yesterday. so i asked the romney campaign, is denni
for president of the united states he went on vacation in europe and daniel schorr, "cbs evening news." foreign correspondent reported that barry goldwater's planned trip to europe was really a clandestine effort to meet up with neo-nazi elements in hitler's stomping ground in order to coordinate the fall campaign. goldwater actually sued and won which is one of the very few times we ever get liabled or slandered by the press and get punishment for it. since 1987 the media research center has been documenting these attacks and providing fodder for people like me and others to sort of turn the tables on them. the more, the trend has always been more you admire a leader, conservative leader like goldwater or reagan or clarence thomas or jesse helms or rush limbaugh the entire congressional class of 1994 or the tea party movement most of the united states, western civilization, basically anything that is on the side of truth, justice and the american way we get demonized for it and treated as if we're some sort of other worldly evil creatures. so tonight we give you some snippets down memory rain
, that is a date, agreed with that come a few years later the united states passed the reformation act 97 to to two opposed that decision. >> i just want to adhere the justice khalil once compared me to robespierre. [laughter] >> are you bragging are complaining? dana and i are old friends. there is religious freedom restoration act was sponsored by two people, the most conservative, ted kennedy of massachusetts and orrin hatch of utah. anyway, so also i have been very upset that some people, even in this country, but even in germany of putting restrictions on the revision that practice female circumcision. i just think that's atrocious. but there is a more extended concept of religious liberty, refers not to crack as for his own adherents, but to church or religious organization that have employees that do not belong to their religion. i will speak here from the roman catholic perspective and address this question with regard to catholic institutions such as hospitals, colleges come in terms of providing contraceptive health care, contraceptive health care insurance for its employees. this obvious
that we are very close to the united states which is clearly an advantage, but also we are investing a lot of infrastructure and in a very important thing, charlie, which is human capital. we have built in this six years 140 new universities from greenfields, public and free tuition universities. and we add there are like 113,000 new engineers graduating every year in mexico so today there are more engineers every year than in germany or u.k. or canada or brazil. and with that, a lot of companies, american and global companies are realizing that mexico is very, very competitive in manufacturing, for instance. even vis-a-vis china. >> rose: ed thing we read about are two big issues, one is narco terrorism. what is it going to take to win that battle? the second is immigration. >> well first a lot of courage, because otherwise it is impossible to deal with that. and you need to have the principals that no one nation could prosper without rule of law. because that is exactly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 327 (some duplicates have been removed)